Program

Monday, 7th May, 2012

Welcome

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Argyro Katsika: Coordination of prosodic events at boundaries

In this talk, a theoretical account of boundary tones and their interaction with stress is presented, framed within Articulatory Phonology. Via an articulatory magnetometer study of Greek, the coordination of boundary tones with oral gestures is explored. A variety of boundary tones in both accented and de-accented phrase-final words, stressed on the ultima, penult or [...]

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Susanne Fuchs: Breathing cycles during speaking and listening: Data and modelling (with Amélie Rochet-Capellan, Leonardo Lancia & Pascal Perrier)

In this talk we will introduce the largest physiological unit of prosody, the breath group (Lieberman, 1966). Based on acoustic and respiratory data, we will focus on three main topics: (1) Breath groups and linguistic structure in spontaneous speech data Speakers do not take breaths randomly while talking. Inhalation follows to a large extent linguistic [...]

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Štefan Beňuš: Temporal alignment of oral and glottal gestures under continuous prosodic variability

It is well known that discrete contrasts in prosodic structure – in terms of the strength of a prosodic boundary or the type/presence of a pitch accent – affect the organization of the units in speech production. We ask if (and how) also non-discrete and functionally low prosodic variability arising from induced continuous variation in [...]

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Coffee Break

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Taehong Cho: Effects of prosodic boundary and syllable structure on CV articulation and its intergestural timing in Korean

In this talk, I will report some results of an EMA study which investigates effects of prosodic boundary and syllable structure on various aspects of CV articulation in Korean. The syllable structure was manipulated by creating a two-word sequence with the consonant being either the onset of the following word (#CV) or the coda of [...]

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Cécile Fougeron & Laurianne Georgeton: Domain-initial strengthening on French vowels: interaction with phonological contrasts.

Domain-initial strengthening has mainly been studied for consonants while little is known about its effect on vowel segments. If the basic question in this talk is to assess whether vowels also undergo boundary-induced variations, our main interest is to understand how these variations interact with phonological contrast in a dense vowel system such as the [...]

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Martine Grice, Doris Mücke & Simon Ritter: Tonal onglides and oral gestures

This talk looks at the production and perception of focus types in German. A corpus of read sentences was analysed in terms of intonational onglide (the pitch movement _onto_ the accented syllable) and offglide (the pitch movement _from_ the accented syllable), as well as in terms of lip kinematics (displacement and duration of the transvocalic [...]

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Adrian Simpson: Sex-specific acoustic and articulatory correlates of phonological contrast (with Melanie Weirich)

A number of differences between male and female speech can be accounted for by examining anatomical and physiological differences between male and female speakers. Longer, thicker male vocal folds vibrate at a lower natural frequency than their female counterparts. The lowering of the larynx during puberty gives rise to an adult male vocal tract which [...]

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Lunch (at Robert-Koch-Mensa)

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Louis Goldstein: Can cognitive barriers (on prosody) act like physical barriers (on articulation)?

New methods for collection of articulatory data and the development of techniques for automatic alignment of speech with a phonetic transcription have produced an order-of- magnitude increase in the amount of available data on key phonetic observables and how they vary over subjects, utterances, and contexts. This makes it possible to begin to probe the [...]

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Marianne Pouplier: Articulatory correlates of syllable structure: results across languages (with Stefania Marin)

We have over the past years investigated articulatory correlates of syllable structure based on a variety of languages, including German, English, Slovak and Romanian. We present here an overview of our results. In particular, we focus on the question how the segmental effects and the internal structure of a cluster interact with general syllable-position specific [...]

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Juraj Simko: Emergent phonological and prosodic patterns: An optimization account

We present a recent development of our modeling paradigm combining task dynamical implementation of ariculatory phonology with optimization approach akin to hypo- / hyper-articulation theory. Temporal details of intergestural sequencing as well as dynamical parameters of active gestures are treated as emergent from trade-offs between competing efficiency requirements imposed by articulatory, auditory and communication constraints. [...]

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Coffee Break

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Stefan Kopp: Speech-gesture synchrony and multimodal prosody

Speakers structure their utterances prosodically, not only in speech but also using their non-verbal modalities. Their multimodal behavior is thus a result of each modality’s dynamic production process as well as a need to create coherent and consistent multimodal deliveries. For example, speech and co-verbal gesturing are commonly assumed to be finely coordinated with regard [...]

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Tine Mooshammer: Speech errors around the world (with Mark Tiede, Louis Goldstein, Hosung Nam, Hansook Choi, Man Gao, Argyro Katsika, Yueh-chin Chang, Feng-fan Hsieh, Christina Hagedorn)

As has been shown in a number of EMA studies with tongue twister-like syllable sequence tasks, the majority of occurring errors are intrusive gestures varying in amplitude that are coproduced with the intended target, and phonemic substitution errors are only rarely observed (see Pouplier & Goldstein 2005, Goldstein, Pouplier et al. 2007 etc.). The first [...]

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Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson: Computing spatial and temporal coordination using correlation map analysis

Recently, we have developed a powerful tool for computing momentary (instantaneous) correlation between signals for any range of temporal offsets between the two signals (Barbosa et al 2012 [JASA 131(3), 2162-2172]). The result is a two-dimensional map that provides a surprisingly realistic means of assessing the temporal fluctuations that occur continually in biological coordination. Our [...]

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Barbecue (at IfL Phonetik)

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Tuesday, 8th May, 2012

Ingo Hertrich: Speech timing in the listening brain – syllables and pitch

The speech signal is a rapid sequence of acoustic events that has to be encoded under time-critical conditions. During speech perception, the speech envelope, i.e., the time course of acoustic intensity, is directly reflected in electrophysiological brain activity. Acoustic correlates of syllable onsets and of pitch periodicity show even sharper brain responses, as can be [...]

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Phil Hoole & Lasse Bombien: Articulatory correlates of prosodic boundaries: evidence from mouth and throat

Previous research has shown that prosodic structure manifests itself in many different ways in the acoustic and articulatory domains. Articulatory studies so far have focused on prosodic strengthening and lengthening effects on oral articulations. In this talk, we will present initial results of a laryngeal transillumination study of Dutch speakers. The recorded speech material was [...]

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Adamantios Gafos: Dynamic invariance

One view of the relation between phonological organization and phonetic indices holds that the phonetic reflexes of different phonological organizations are fixed (e.g., in syllable-final position stops are voiceless, high vowels have low F1, syllable onsets show a specific stability pattern, and so on). This view is attractive because it makes strong predictions about the [...]

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Coffee Break

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Meeting

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Lunch

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