Foto: Daniel Baleckaitis

Program

Monday, 17th July, 2017

(Informal) Get-together @Hallmackenreuther

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Tuesday, 18th July, 2017

Welcome

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Martijn Wieling: “Discovering articulatory patterns using generalized additive modeling”

In this presentation I will explain how Generalized Additive Modeling (GAMs) may be used to analyze articulatory data. I will illustrate the approach with two different studies involving articulatory data. The first study focused on Dutch dialect data, whereas the second study compared articulatory trajectories of native and second-language speakers of English. Both studies show that GAMs are […]

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Susanne Fuchs: “Stability and flexibility of respiratory rhythms in different speech and motor tasks”

Respiration is a vital biological rhythm in all mammals from the first cry at birth to the last sigh at death. It shows a large stability, since the absence of inhalation over ca. 10-15 minutes leads to brain dead. Apart from the stability of respiratory rhythms, temporal properties of breathing cycles and their form are […]

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Coffee

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Aude Noiray: “Coarticulatory organization in children”

In this talk, I will present recent research that examined (V)CV coarticulation in German children, spanning the preschool years when children have limited phonological knowledge and control over their speech production system to the first school year when both motor and phonological knowledge are henceforth used for literacy acquisition. I will focus on the development […]

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Ioana Chitoran & Harim Kwon: “Perception-production of “non-native” CCV and CVCV: What matters for speakers of a cluster-heavy language?”

Consonant clusters in different languages are produced with different degrees of timing lag. For instance, German and French onset clusters are produced with relatively shorter inter-consonant lag than Georgian ones. The present study examines sensitivity to these timing differences in both perception and production, across two languages: Georgian, a cluster-heavy language with longer lag, and […]

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Lunch

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Aviad Albert & Bruno Nicenboim: “Linking sonority with periodic energy: Preliminary findings from production and perception”

Pitch intelligibility and its acoustic correlate—periodic energy—are a pair of often neglected perceptual-acoustic dimensions of speech. We present measurements of periodic energy of speech recordings that reveal a tight correlation with the sonority hierarchy, suggesting pitch intelligibility as the long-debated phonetic basis of sonority. In this talk we will focus on the following implications that […]

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Kamil Kazmierski & Andreas Baumann: “Perceptual effects of ambiguity in the long-term development of boundary-signaling consonant clusters: combining experiments and dynamical systems in (mor)phonotactic research”

Despite having vanishingly small effects on a short time scale, articulatory, perceptual and cognitive factors can greatly influence the long-term development of linguistic systems via multiple repeated and parallel production-perception loops. In linguistic research, short-term effects are usually measured by employing experimental methods, while long-term developments can be inferred from inspecting diachronic data or comparing […]

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Christopher Carignan: “Gradiency in (mis)perception of articulatory co-variation: Naïve listener imitations of native articulatory strategies”

Although a traditional characterization of vowel nasality involves the somewhat implicit assumption that vowel nasalization is binary (i.e., nasal vowels are nasal, oral vowels are not), both phonetic and phonological vowel nasalization has been shown to involve changes to the shape of the oral tract, as well as an increase in breathy voicing, in addition […]

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Coffee

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Gabriel Mindlin: “A dynamical system´s approach to birdsong production”

Birdsong production is a complex behavior that emerges when a highly specialized peripheral vocal organ, the syrinx, is driven by a set of well-coordinated physiological instructions. These are generated by a neural circuitry, which is reasonably well characterized. In this presentation, I will describe a computational model whose variables are the average activities of different […]

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Mark Tiede & Louis Goldstein: “A mutual power analysis of speech error data”

The production of metronome-driven CVC sequences shows an imbalance in observed error rates when alternation is in onset (e.g. “cop top”) vs. coda (e.g. “top tock”).  Kinematic data from nine AE speakers aggregated across instrusions, reductions, and substitutions show rates of 5.4% for onset and 13.7% for coda respectively, or more than twice as often […]

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Reminiscing about Eric Vatikiotis-Bateson

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BBQ & Live music @IfL Phonetik

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Wednesday, 19th July, 2017

Doug Whalen: “Characteristics and usefulness of phonetic variability”

Speech is well-known to be quite variable, and this variability has both impeded and informed theoretical and practical endeavors for decades.  In this talk, I will outline aspects of the consistency of variability within speakers; re-examine the possible differences in variability in acoustics vs. articulation; and explore the possibility that variability has usefulness in establishing […]

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Adamantios Gafos & Stephan Kuberski: “Kinematics of repetitive speech movements”

A standard model of isolated speech movements is thought to be a linear second order system (Saltzman and Munhall, 1989). Several variations to this model have been proposed which claim to render isolated as well as sequences of speech movements more accurately. There are also proposals from other areas of motor control which aim to […]

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Coffee

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Marianne Pouplier & Phil Hoole: “Consonant timing around the world – data from seven languages”

In this talk, we aim to  further our understanding of the range of consonant coarticulation or overlap patterns found cross-linguistically. It has long been known that languages differ in coarticulation patterns, yet there is little systematic cross-linguistic work which would allow us to gain an estimate of the range of possible patterns. Such knowledge is […]

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Taehong Cho: “Articulatory studies on preboundary lengthening in American English and Korean”

In this talk I will present some preliminary articulatory data (obtained with an EMA) on kinematic characteristics of preboundary lengthening in American English and Korean. The study on American English examined distribution of preboundary lengthening as a function of prominence (lexical stress and accent) in di- and tri-syllabic pseudo words in American English, and the […]

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Tine Mooshammer, Malte Belz & Oksana Rasskazova: “How final is final? Kinematic aspects of phrase-final and utterance-final lengthening”

Phrasal structure within utterances is signaled by tonal variation, pauses, phrase-initial strengthening and final lengthening. The latter has been seen as localized speech rate reduction, slowing down at the end of a phrase. For German  two kinds of phrase boundaries are generally assumed, namely the intermediate phrase (ip) and intonational phrase (IP) boundaries (see e.g. […]

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Lunch & closing

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